Ap language and composition essays 2005

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION The Exam

  • Wed, May 16, 2018

AP English Language and Composition Exam Day 2018

  • 8 a. m. | 3 hrs 15 mins

Exam Overview

The AP English Language and Composition Exam includes multiple-choice and free-response questions that test essential skills covered in the course curriculum:

  • reading comprehension of rhetorically and topically diverse texts
  • rhetorical analysis of individual texts in isolation
  • synthesis of information from multiple texts
  • written argumentation

Encourage your students to visit the AP English Language and Composition student page for exam information and exam practice.

Exam Format

Multiple Choice — 52 to 55 Questions | 1 Hour | 45% of Exam Score

  • Excerpts from non-fiction texts are accompanied by several multiple-choice questions

Section II

Free Response — 3 Free-Response Questions | 2 Hours, 15 Minutes (includes a 15-minute reading period) | 55% of Exam Score

This section has three prompts:

  • Synthesis: Students read several texts about a topic and create an argument that synthesizes at least three of the sources to support their thesis.
  • Rhetorical analysis: Students read a non-fiction text and analyze how the writer’s language choices contribute to his or her purpose and intended meaning for the text.
  • Argument: Students create an evidence-based argument that responds to a given topic.

The total Section II time is 2 hours and 15 minutes. This includes a 15-minute reading period. The reading period is designed to provide students with time to develop thoughtful, well-organized responses. They may begin writing their responses before the reading period is over.

AP English Language and Composition

Course Overview

What makes this course interesting?

  • Strengthen the effectiveness of your writing through close reading and frequent practice at applying rhetorical strategies, analyzing information from source texts, and writing arguments
  • Become a critical reader of predominantly nonfiction works, including expository, argumentative, analytical, and personal texts from various authors and time periods

Keep an “assertion journal” in which given a quote, you will analyze and evaluate a writer’s assertion

Conduct research on a topic and then use that information to create your own argument or assertion about the topic

Participate in a roundtable discussion in which you’ll present research and examine key questions on an assigned topic

Learn about the elements that define effective argument and composition through the critical analysis and interpretation of complex texts.

Understand the interactions among a writer’s purpose, audience, subject, and genre and how each of these contributes to effective writing. Enhance your own writing skills and understand better each stage of the writing process as you develop expository, analytical, and argumentative compositions.

AP English Language and Composition

Exam Practice

Exam Day 2019

Exam Resources

You can use the resources below as you prepare for the AP Exam.

Click here for details about the exam format.

Sample Questions

You’ll find sample multiple-choice and free-response questions in the AP English Language and Composition Course Description (.pdf/3.25MB).

Sample Responses

Student Responses to past exam free-response questions are available on AP Central.

Study Skills

Check out our Reading Study Skills and Writing Study Skills as you prepare for the exam.

Free Response Questions and Scoring Guidelines

Free Response Questions and Scoring Guidelines: login

The following resources contain the remaining available Free Response Questions and Scoring Guidelines for the AP English Language and Composition Exam. To access the files below, you need to log into your College Board account. If you do not have a College Board account, you can create one by selecting ‘Sign In’ in the header and following the prompts to Sign-Up.