Common app essay 2013 pdf

Common app essay 2013 pdf

Common Application Essay Questions for 2013-2014

The people behind The Common Application have just released the new essay prompts (PDF link) for college applicants who apply in the 2013-2014 admissions season. As noted in The Common Application Board of Directors’ announcement, these new prompts are the result of two years of discussion about where essays fit in the overall college admissions process. This is the first big change to the essays in years (including to the word counts!), and it’s clear that the Common Application Board didn’t take the task of reworking these essays lightly.

Without further ado, here are the all-new Common Application essay prompts:

Common Application Essay Questions for 2013-2014

  • Some students have a background or story that is so central to their identity that they believe their
    Application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.
  • Recount an incident or time when you experienced failure. How did it affect you, and what lessons
    Did you learn?
  • Reflect on a time when you challenged a belief or idea. What prompted you to act? Would you
    Make the same decision again?
  • Describe a place or environment where you are perfectly content. What do you do or experience
    There, and why is it meaningful to you?
  • Discuss an accomplishment or event, formal or informal, that marked your transition from
    Childhood to adulthood within your culture, community, or family.

Which Essay Prompt Should You Choose?
To paraphrase the advice given in the announcement, you should choose the essay prompt that best allows you to tell the application readers something about you that they won’t get from your high transcripts and test scores. Note that these are all “touchy-feely” topics, not questions about your SAT scores or where you placed in the Math Olympics.

This type of reflection is often hard for young people to do well (the hardest topic to write about is usually you!), but just know that college admissions officers aren’t perfect, they know you’re not perfect, and you’re frankly more interesting when you show something other than how perfect you are. It’s okay to reveal a weakness or a fear, or to share something that seems silly, as long as it helps admissions officers feel like they got to know you better and it makes it easier for them to imagine you walking around their campus a year or two from now. Being real is better than simply being impressive.

Common Application Word Limits
You must submit only one essay, and it must be no more than 650 words. This is big news in its own right: The word limit was just 500 words last year! Trust us: Those extra 150 words can make all the difference in the world when you’re trying to whittle down your story. You don’t need to use all 650 words… As The Common Application folks say, “650 words is your limit, not your goal.” If you can tell your story in an impactful way in just 400 words, then great. Some of our all-time favorite admissions essays are also some of the shortest we have seen.

Note that there is actually also a minimum word limit: 250 words. The system won’t accept anything shorter than that, although we doubt many college applicants will end up with first drafts shorter than 250 words.

Update: Check out Our most recent article including three tips you should follow to write a standout Common Application essay!

Plan on applying to college soon? Veritas Prep offers college admissions consulting to help you find the schools that best fit you, improve your applications, and land a significant financial aid package. Also, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google Plus, and follow us on Twitter!

IvyWise College Admissions Blog

2013-2014 Common Application Essay Questions

Tue, Feb 05, 2013 @ 09:57 AM

The Common Application Announces 2013-2014 Essay Prompts, Longer Word Limit

Today the Common Application released the essay prompts for the 2013-2014 application, along with news that they will enforce a strict 650 word limit, an increase of 150 words from the previous 500 word limit.

There has been controversy surrounding the Common Application’s new essay prompts since it was announced they were eliminating the «topic of your choice» essay option. According to the organization, the development of the prompts and the word limit came after much consideration from the counselors on the Outreach Advisory Committee.

The Common App also clarified on its Facebook page that the short answer activity essay will not be part of the main application in 2013-2014. Schools will instead choose whether or not to ask a version of it on their supplements.

Below are the instructions and the new essay prompts for the 2013-14 Common Application, set to be released in August.

Instructions. The essay demonstrates your ability to write clearly and concisely on a selected topic and helps you distinguish yourself in your own voice. What do you want the readers of your application to know about you apart from courses, grades, and test scores? Choose the option that best helps you answer that question and write an essay of no more than 650 words, using the prompt to inspire and structure your response. Remember: 650 words is your limit, not your goal. Use the full range if you need it, but don’t feel obligated to do so. (The application won’t accept a response shorter than 250 words.)

«Some students have a background or story that is so central to their identity that they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.»

«Recount an incident or time when you experienced failure. How did it affect you, and what lessons did you learn?»

«Reflect on a time when you challenged a belief or idea. What prompted you to act? Would you make the same decision again?»

«Describe a place or environment where you are perfectly content. What do you do or experience there, and why is it meaningful to you?»

«Discuss an accomplishment or event, formal or informal, that marked your transition from childhood to adulthood within your culture, community, or family.»

What do you think of the new essay prompts? Do you think there should still be a «topic of choice?» Tell us in the comments!

Free SAT Prep

Practice for 15 minutes each day to get ready for the SAT.

Print Admission Ticket

Check for Test Center Closings

Introducing the College Board Opportunity Scholarships

Upcoming Events

Regular Registration Deadline for Dec SAT

Next SAT and SAT Subject Tests

Nov SAT Scores Available

Featured Articles

View the Test Day Checklist

Find Out What to Expect on Test Day

Get SAT Registration Tips

Learn How to Send Your SAT Scores

Interpret Your SAT Scores

Educators: Get Your Guide to Scores

Download Forms and Other Educator Resources

Get an Overview of SAT Subject Tests

Section Topics

Inside the Test

Find out what kinds of questions you’ll see and what the test measures.

Watch videos, get personalized help, take a practice SAT, and answer daily questions.

Taking the Test

Learn all about acceptable IDs, approved calculators, and the test day experience.

Register for the SAT

Get SAT dates and info on fee waivers, IDs, the essay option, policies, and more.

Learn when scores come out and how to send, interpret, cancel, or verify scores.

K–12 Educators

Find what you need to help students do their best and understand their SAT scores.

SAT Practice Test 5

Simulate test day with an official practice test. Then, score your test. The answers come with explanations so you can learn from your mistakes.

SAT Practice Test 5

Simulate test day with an official practice test. Then, score your test. The answers come with explanations so you can learn from your mistakes.

SAT Practice Test 5

This full-length, official SAT practice test was written by the same people who wrote the SAT. Download it to get started.

PDF Document 7.59 MB

SAT Practice Test Answer Sheet

Download and print this answer sheet to take the full-length practice test. It will look a little different from the one you’ll use when you take the official SAT, but the rules are the same: use a No. 2 pencil, completely fill in circles, and track your place so you won’t get tripped up if you skip a question.

PDF Document 1.55 MB

SAT Practice Essay 5

Take the full SAT — download the practice essay question and analyze an authentic source text.

PDF Document 752.27 KB

SAT Practice Test 5 Answer Explanations

Download the answers — and the explanations that show why they are right — for SAT Practice Test 5.

[/H1toH2]