Essay plan example template

Construct an Essay Plan

Step 3: Construct an initial essay plan

After you have generated some ideas, it’s important to write an initial plan before you head for the library. This can feel strange—after all, how can you answer a question when you haven’t done any research?—but starting with an initial plan helps you order your ideas and focus your reading. Without a sense of which direction to head in, it’s easy to get lost in the research process.

This initial plan will be provisional and might consist of:

  • a provisional answer to the question (or thesis statement)
  • a brief outline of possible main points

As you research and develop your understanding of the topic, your ideas will likely change, and your answers may change with them. Try to see your essay plan as something that evolves as you engage further with your topic.

While it’s a good idea to write an initial plan before you start researching, if you really know nothing at all about the topic, some initial skimming and browsing through recommended or assigned readings can provide a few ideas. However, the initial planning stage is not the time for a lot of intensive or detailed reading.

What elements should an essay plan consist of?

A 1-2 sentence THESIS STATEMENT

A plan should indicate the answer to the question. A clear and well-written thesis statement will help you to determine the direction and structure of your argument.

What is a thesis statement?

  • a clear and direct answer to the essay question
  • a claim that can be discussed and expanded further in the body of the essay
  • one or two complete sentences
  • part of the introduction

In the initial plan, the thesis statement is usually provisional. However, after you’ve done some research, you will need to work on your thesis statement until it is clear, concise and effective.

  • Try introducing your thesis statement with the phrase ‘this essay will argue’ or ‘this essay argues’.
  • Paraphrasing the assignment question can help ensure that you are answering it.

Possible MAIN POINTS

Once you have a thesis statement, follow it with a paragraph or a set of points that indicate the ‘reasons why’ for your answer. The ‘reasons why’ can be developed into the main points of your essay.

What are main points?

  • Main points make up the body of an essay.
  • Each point should be developed in a paragraph. These paragraphs are the building blocks used to construct the argument.
  • In a 1000-1500 word essay, aim for three to four main points

In the initial plan, try to express the main idea of each point in a single, clear sentence. These can become topic sentences (the first sentence of each paragraph which establishes its central idea) when, in your second plan, you develop these points further.

Arrange your main points in a logical order and number them (is there one that would seem to go first or one that would seem to go last? Are there any two that are closely linked? How are the ideas connected to each other? Do the main points, when considered as a whole, present a unified discussion?).

the STRUCTURE of the essay

A plan should follow the STRUCTURE of an essay (eg. Introduction, body and conclusion).

While you may not be ready to construct an introduction or conclusion, this three-part structure should be at least suggested in your plan.

For more about essay structure, see The Learning Centre’s essay writing guide

some indication of the RESEARCH

A plan should include some indication of the sources you might use to RESEARCH the topic.

Make a few notes about how each main point might be developed. Consider and if possible, specify the evidence you might draw on and which texts you might refer to. Jot down titles, authors, page numbers etc.

Write an essay plan

A good essay plan helps you arrange your ideas logically and stay on track during the writing process.

Your plan should state how you’re going to prove your argument, including the evidence you’re going to use. Structure your plan around the different parts of an essay. To do this:

  • Write your argument in one sentence at the top of the page – you’ll flesh this out into your introduction.
  • Write three or four key points that you think will support your argument. Try to write each point in one sentence. These will become your topic sentences.
  • Under each point, write down one or two examples from your research that support your point. These can be quotes, paraphrased text from reliable authors, etc. Remember to reference your examples when you write up your essay.
  • Finally, write the main point you want to leave in your reader’s mind – that’s your conclusion.

How to Write an Essay Plan: An Example

File under: Essay Writing September 13, 2011 By Elite Editing

Before you start writing your essay, it is important that you plan it. Below is an example of what an essay plan should look like (including explanations and tips), and how much detail it should contain. You can use this as a guide for your essay plans.

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Essay Question: Was the Russian Revolution a genuine revolution or was it a coup?

Word Limit: 2,000 words

Introduction (10% of word limit): 200 words

Introductions should never be longer than 500 words, so this 10% guide only applies to essays shorter than 5,000 words.

To be considered an Introduction, an Introduction must do two things:

Answer the question – It was a genuine revolution.
This must be done first. An Introduction must answer the question. This is how you put forward a strong argument.

List the evidence your essay will put forward to prove your answer – This can be seen through an examination of the sections of society which supported the revolution. workers, peasants, soldiers, national minorities. Any major topic or subject that you plan to discuss in your essay must be introduced in the Introduction.

Body of the Essay: 400 words each

How long you spend writing about each subject should reflect the importance of each subject. If all four topics are of equal importance, write roughly the same amount of words on each. If a topic is more important, write about it first and write more words on it. If a topic is less important, write about it last and write fewer words on it.

Topic 1: workers

Topic 2: peasants

Topic 3: soldiers

Topic 4: national minorities

Conclusion (10% of word limit): 200 words

Conclusions should never be longer than 500 words, so this 10% guide only applies to essays shorter than 5,000 words.

To be considered a Conclusion, a Conclusion must do two things:

Answer the essay question again (using different words than in the Introduction, don’t repeat yourself exactly) – It was a genuine revolution.

Recap (repeat, summaries) all the evidence you have given to prove your answer during your essay – workers, peasants, soldiers, national minorities

A conclusion must not contain any new information, you are only summarising what you have already written.

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