How to write an argument essay conclusion

How to Write a Conclusion for an Argumentative Essay

Writing an argumentative essay requires you to defend a position for which there is more than one side. To write an argumentative essay, use facts, statistics, details and expert testimony to support your position. While a conclusion for an argumentative essay does include some basic elements found in other types of papers, argumentative essay conclusions are significant, because they provide the last chance you have to sway the reader.

Preparing to Write

Read through your body paragraphs, taking notes on key points of the argument that you want to remind the reader of before the end of the essay. Use the strongest, most logical points of your argument to structure the conclusion so that you have the best chance of convincing the reader of the validity of your position. Review your introduction and include key phrases in the conclusion to add a sense of cohesion and closure to the argument and to the essay.

Beginning Sentences

The conclusion should be an overview of the points you have argued, reminding the reader of the importance of the topic and the legitimacy of your side of the debate. Rephrase your thesis statement in a way that intensifies the claim of your argument. For example, if you are writing about the need for mandatory recycling in your town, the first sentence of your conclusion might read: “Keeping our city from turning into one, big waste dump is each citizen’s responsibility.” This sentence jolts the reader into a sense of duty and also creates a negative image in the mind.

Middle Sentences

The middle sentences of an argumentative conclusion should include the most convincing and rational points of your argument. The reader will remember your conclusion more vividly than all of the detailed evidence that you supplied in the body paragraphs, so synthesize your main points rather than summarizing them. You might explain how much waste recycling helps avoid, for instance, based on facts you presented in the paper. Avoid introducing new information in the conclusion, as this will cloud the issue and weaken your position.

Final Sentences

The last sentences should include a call to action or a prediction of future ramifications. For example, you might include a sentence that urges your readers to attend city council meetings so that they can encourage leaders to vote in favor of a recycling initiative. Alternatively, you could make a prediction of what might happen if all households do not start recycling, such as the fact that more waste-disposal stations may need to be built to hold all of the garbage being produced. In doing so, you would remind readers of facts you stated previously in the body paragraphs detailing how much waste the community is currently producing and how close the local dump is to capacity. You might also include a reminder that dump sites could be built near readers’ homes, which would make the issue personal.

How to End an Essay

The final paragraph of an essay is what ties the piece together into a single, cohesive whole. Coming up with a good ending can be tricky, but understanding what elements it should and shouldn’t have will help you craft a stellar conclusion worthy of nothing less than an A+.

Steps Edit

Part One of Three:
Brainstorming Your Conclusion Edit

Part Two of Three:
Writing the Conclusion Edit

Part Three of Three:
Avoiding Common Pitfalls Edit

Community Q&A

  • An argumentative essay means a written debate. You are going to debate your points on a specific statement. Go for double sided statements. For example, «Homework is helpful, but under some circumstances, it poses a hazard.» Such statements prove that you believe you are correct, but acknowledge that other opinions exist. This is a perfect way to end an argumentative essay.
  • Elaborate on them by giving an example for each point, one sentence each. Read other conclusions to essays to help you to get a better feel for them rather than over-focusing on construction perfection — learning by seeing other conclusions often works best.
  • One great way to start the conclusion of an essay is to restate your thesis, but it depends on the content of the essay and what you want your reader to take away from the essay.
  • The conclusion is a reverse process of the introduction. Start with the thesis statement (write it in a different way), then summarize your points. Remember you can only write what supports your body paragraphs, not what’s in the body paragraphs themselves.
  • First, start with a small transition, then briefly summarize some of the main points, after that be sure to work your thesis statement into the conclusion in one way or another. Finally, end with a flourish. Your last sentence should be elegant, to the point and proactive.
  • You could simply say what the reader (or you) learned about the planet from your essay. You provided information throughout your essay and the conclusion wraps it up.
  • This will largely depend on the level of history that you are working on and the type of essay you are writing. However, a good conclusion will generally involve a restatement of the thesis that you began your essay with and will leave the reader with a few final thoughts related to the essay’s subject.
  • Follow the guidelines in the article. Briefly summarize the main ideas/arguments you discussed in your essay. Acknowledge that there are some good arguments for the opposite position, but that the arguments for your position are more numerous or more compelling. If you want, highlight one point you find especially important. You can end by connecting everything to a broader context, e. g., «Doing X will help ensure we have a world where Y» or something along those lines.
  • Talk about the impact he/she has made on the world, and how it affects/affected other people’s lives.
  • Yes. As long as it’s relevant to the essay, you may end it with a quote or reference.

Quick Summary

When you’re ready to end your essay, write a final paragraph that summarizes the main points of your body paragraphs and ties them back to your thesis statement. Keep this paragraph between 5 and 7 sentences long, and end it with an ironic statement, emotional comment, or call to action that illustrates the main theme of the essay. The final paragraph should pack a punch, so avoid bogging it down with new ideas or content.

How to Write an Argument Essay Step by Step

Virginia has been a university English instructor for over 20 years. She specializes in helping people write essays faster and easier.

What is an Argumentative Essay?

Argument essays seek to state a position on an issue and give several reasons, supported by evidence, for agreeing with that position.

Finding Ideas to Write About

Argument essay topics can be found everywhere. Check the headlines of a newspaper, or just listen in on a conversation at Starbucks. Chances are, you will hear someone trying to persuade another person to believe in their claim about:

  • Is it true?
  • What caused this?
  • How important is it?
  • What should we do about it?

Stuck for an idea? Check out my Easy Argument Topics List.

5 Types of Argument Claims

1. Fact: Is it true or not?

2. Definition: What does it really mean?

3. Value: How important is it?

4. Cause and Effect: What is the cause? What are the effects?

5. Policy: What should we do about it?

How to Write Your Thesis

Question/Answer format: To make your topic idea into a thesis you need to turn the topic idea into a question first. Examples:

  • Does divorce cause serious problems for the children? (fact)
  • What is «domestic violence?» (definition)
  • What are the causes of divorce? (cause)
  • How important is it for couples to avoid divorce? (value)
  • What can you do to make your marriage divorce-proof? (proposal)

Answer: Your question often can be the title of your paper, or it can be the last line of the introduction. Your answer to this question is your thesis.

Example: The most important way to make your marriage divorce-proof is to make sure you have carefully prepared for that commitment.

Refute Objections: You might want to put an introductory phrase in the first part of your thesis to show that you are refuting other ideas about the answer.

Example: While some people think there is no way to divorce-proof your marriage, studies have shown that there are fewer divorces when people carefully prepare for that commitment.

Roadmap: An additional way to make a strong thesis is to do a «Roadmap» which tells in just a few words the three or more main points you will cover.

Example: While some people think there is no way to divorce-proof your marriage, studies have shown that there are fewer divorces when people carefully prepare for that commitment by taking time to get to know the other person before becoming engaged, spending time with one another’s family and friends, talking about hot-button issues like finances, and getting extensive premarital counseling.

Introduction and Conclusion

Outlining Your Paper

Argument essays are fairly straightforward in their organization. In your paper, you will need to do the following

  1. Interest the reader in the situation and make them think it is worth learning more about.
  2. Explain the controversy or problem clearly.
  3. Explain the sides of the debate.
  4. Tell them your side.
  5. Convince them that your side is the best one to take.
  6. Refute any objections they may be thinking about as they read.
  7. Urge the reader to adopt our point of view to do, think or believe something.

I. Introduction: Explain the subject, the controversy, and end with your thesis. Here are some tips:

  • Use the title to present your point of view. Often the title can be a question.
  • Think about your audience—what aspects of this issue would most interest or convince them?
  • Check out the introduction and conclusion chart for creative ways to introduce your paper.
  • Make sure you have a clear thesis which answers the question. The thesis should tell your position and is usually the last sentence of your introduction.

III. Body: Explains the reasons your audience should agree with your thesis. Your body needs to also refute objections or other points of view.

1. Reasons and support

  • Usually, you will have three or more reasons why the reader should accept your position. These will be your topic sentences.
  • Support each of these reasons with argument, examples, statistics, authorities or anecdotes
  • To make your reasons seem plausible, connect them back to your position by using “if…then” reasoning

2. Anticipate opposing positions and objections

  • What objections will your readers have? Answer them with argument or evidence.
  • What other positions do people take on this subject? What is your reason for rejecting these positions?

Conclusion: Make a final point which tells the reader what to think or do.

  • Why should the reader adopt your point of view?
  • You might use the anticipating objections in the conclusion.