Ib history extended essay mark scheme

Ib history extended essay mark scheme

Extended Essay Guide: Criteria, Format, Sample EEs

The Assessment Criteria in Brief!

The Assessment Crtiteria in Detail!

Notes from the IB

RE: Research Question and Title of Extended Essay

Please note the statement below from the EE curriculum manager regarding the need to have both a title and a RQ for all subjects. Previous versions of the EE Guide indicated that the title and the RQ should be the same for History, Business Management and Mathematics. This is no longer the case. All essays, regardless of the subject, need to have both a RQ and a title.

To answer your question, I am going to quote directly from a response John Royce provided, on this forum, in October in response to a very similar question: (it was a question about using Spanish sources — hence the mention of Spanish)

It is certainly permissible to use sources which are not in the language of the essay, but translation into the target language is required, one cannot assume that the reader understands the original language.

It is usual to quote the original as well as presenting the translation. [Do not put quotation marks around your translation, just around the original]

Umberto Eco argues («in Mouse or rat?») that direct translation may lose meaning, paraphrase or use of different idioms may be required to get the ideas across. Paul Bellos («Is that a fish in your ear?») makes a similar argument — direct translation may confound meaning. Direct translation may not be ideal — meaning and understanding are preferred — so, not to worry that your student with her good Spanish cannot present a direct translation.

What must be made clear is that the translations are those of the student; these are her understandings. Readers can make of that what they will — and if unsure, are presented with the original — they can seek another translation. A note in the acknowledgements and/or in the introduction to the effect that all translations are those of the writer is. essential.

In response to the question about the Bibliography/Works cited, my preference would be to list the source in its original Thai version, but perhaps with the English in brackets, to help the examiner.

Your bibliography will have the entries in Thai characters first in the document. Any in-text citation to Thai sources will be in (Thai characters [English translation]).

Ex:

Citation in Thai [English translation]

Format of the Extended Essay

The extended essay should be written in a clear, correct and formal academic style, appropriate to the subject from which the topic is drawn. Given that the extended essay is a formally written research paper, it should strive to maintain a professional, academic look.

To help achieve this, the following formatting is Required:

  • 12-point, readable font (Calibri or Times New Roman);
  • Double spacing throughout entire Essay;
  • Page numbering — top right corner;
  • No candidate or school name or supervisor name on the title page or page headers.

Submitting the extended essay in the required format will help set the tone of the essay and will aid readability for on-screen assessment by examiners.

Required S tructure

The structure of the essay is very important. It helps students to organize the argument, making the best use of the evidence collected.

There are six required elements of the final work to be submitted. More details about each element are given in the “Presentation” section. Please note that the order in which these elements are presented here is not necessarily the order in which they should be written.

Six required elements of the extended essay:

  1. Title page
  2. Contents page
  3. Introduction
  4. Body of the essay
  5. Conclusion
  6. References and bibliography — if MLA «Works Cited» if CSE «References»

The title page should include Only the following information:

  • The title of the essay
  • The research question
  • The subject the essay is registered in (if it is a language essay also state which category it falls into; if a world studies essay also state the theme and the two subjects utilized)
  • Word count

The upper limit is 4,000 words for all extended essays.

Please note: Examiners are instructed not to read or assess any material in excess of the word limit. This means that essays containing more than 4,000 words will be compromised across all assessment criteria. Given the holistic nature of the assessment criteria, students who write in excess of the word limit will self-penalize across all criteria.

2. Required Contents Page

A contents page must be provided at the beginning of the extended essay and all pages should be numbered. Please note that an index page is not required and if included will be treated as if it is not present.

3. Required Introduction

The introduction should tell the reader what to expect in the essay. The introduction should make clear to the reader the focus of the essay, the scope of the research, in particular an indication of the sources to be used, and an insight into the line of argument to be taken.

While students should have a sense of the direction and key focus of their essay, it is sometimes advisable to finalize the introduction once the body of the essay is complete.

4. Required Body of the Essay (research, analysis, discussion, and evaluation)

The main task is writing the body of the essay, which should be presented in the form of a reasoned argument. The form of this varies with the subject of the essay but as the argument develops it should be clear to the reader what relevant evidence has been discovered, where/how it has been discovered and how it supports the argument. In some subjects, for example, the sciences, sub-headings within the main body of the essay will help the reader to understand the argument (and will also help the student to keep on track). In structuring their extended essay, students must take into consideration the expected conventions of the subject in which their extended essay is registered.

Once the main body of the essay is complete, it is possible to finalize the introduction (which tells the reader what to expect) and the conclusion (which says what has been achieved, including notes of any limitations and any questions that have not been resolved).

Any information that is important to the argument Must not be included in appendices or footnotes/endnotes. The examiner Will not read notes or appendices, so an essay that is not complete in itself will be compromised across the assessment criteria.

5. Required Conclusion

The conclusion says what has been achieved, including notes of any limitations and any questions that have not been resolved. While students might draw conclusions throughout the essay based on their findings, it is important that there is a final, summative conclusion at the end. This conclusion(s) must relate to the research question posed.

6. Required References & Bibliography

Students should use their chosen style of academic referencing as soon as they start writing. That way they are less likely to forget to include a citation. It is also easier than trying to add references at a later stage. For more information on this, refer to the guidelines in the IB document Effective citing and referencing.

Writing the essay takes time but if students have used their Researcher’s reflection space and reflection sessions in a meaningful way they should be well prepared to develop their arguments.

Ib history extended essay mark scheme

Please fill in the following form to contact the author, Russel Tarr (@russeltarr)

New customer?

The Extended Essay is an individual project of 4000 words.

It is a chance to study a topic that interests you which is not covered by the syllabus.
It can cover any historical topic of your choice from outside the past 10 years.
It is supervised by your History teacher, but marked by the IB board.
It will involve an emphasis on personal research and the use of primary sources.

Click on the following headings to get guidance in choosing a question and writing your study.

After the first batch of studies are marked according to the new criteria in Summer 2018, I hope to upload some particularly good studies to this website to share with everyone.

It gives you a chance to study in real depth a topic that you have an interest in.
It can relate to any period and any topic within the last 10 years.
It gives you the chance to work closely with your History teacher to ‘fast-track’ your historical skills with one-to-one tutoring.
As such it is a great opportunity to produce a mature academic study on something that you might never again have the chance to research.

Similarities:
Both the IA and the EE in History award students who choose an interesting question which they research thoroughly and answer coherently through critical evaluation of evidence.

Differences:
The IA is only 1500 words long; the EE is 4,000 words.
The EE requires a much heavier emphasis on the use of primary source material than the IA.
The IA is structured into specific sections; the EE is structured more flexibly.
The IA markscheme grades each section separately; the EE markscheme grades each criteria across the essay as a whole.

You will select which of your IB subjects will form the basis of your EE in the Spring Term of the first year of IB. This will usually (although not always) be one of your Higher Level subjects. The supervisor will set a series of internal deadlines and meetings for each student to ensure the completion of the study in a timely fashion.

Start by considering if there is a period / place / person / issue in history that would like to investigate further. Maybe this is something you have read a little about, watched a film about or are interested in from your other studies / hobbies. The only strict rule is that anything that happened in the past 10 years is not allowed.

The three main focuses of study tend to be focused on

  • EITHER Causes of an event / situation;
  • OR Consequences of an event / situation
  • OR Relevance of particular evidence about an event / situation (e. g. a painting, novel, film, biography).

The following resources may help you in your quest for a topic:

Online archives:

Other resources:

  • History Department Magazine collection
  • History Department DVD collection

Once you have settled upon a topic, you have to then turn this into a question — a problem that your study will solve, in other words.

Submission deadline

The International Baccalaureate® (IB) sets a submission date for the extended essay, which is communicated with schools.

It is each school’s responsibility to ensure that all candidate work is received by the IB, with the required paperwork received by the submission date set.

Schools should set internal deadlines

Schools and supervisors are strongly recommended to set internal deadlines for the different stages of producing an extended essay, keeping in mind the IB’s submission date.

If you wish to find out more about the deadline for a particular school, please contact that school directly.

Further information on deadline setting

There is further information on the requirements for meeting external deadlines in the Handbook of Procedures for the Diploma Programme.

Educators in IB World Schools can access the relevant parts of the handbook in the IB’s Programme Resource Centre (PRC), using their existing log-in details.

[/H1toH2]

Ib history extended essay mark scheme

Ib history extended essay mark scheme

Extended Essay Guide: Criteria, Format, Sample EEs

The Assessment Criteria in Brief!

The Assessment Crtiteria in Detail!

Notes from the IB

RE: Research Question and Title of Extended Essay

Please note the statement below from the EE curriculum manager regarding the need to have both a title and a RQ for all subjects. Previous versions of the EE Guide indicated that the title and the RQ should be the same for History, Business Management and Mathematics. This is no longer the case. All essays, regardless of the subject, need to have both a RQ and a title.

To answer your question, I am going to quote directly from a response John Royce provided, on this forum, in October in response to a very similar question: (it was a question about using Spanish sources — hence the mention of Spanish)

It is certainly permissible to use sources which are not in the language of the essay, but translation into the target language is required, one cannot assume that the reader understands the original language.

It is usual to quote the original as well as presenting the translation. [Do not put quotation marks around your translation, just around the original]

Umberto Eco argues («in Mouse or rat?») that direct translation may lose meaning, paraphrase or use of different idioms may be required to get the ideas across. Paul Bellos («Is that a fish in your ear?») makes a similar argument — direct translation may confound meaning. Direct translation may not be ideal — meaning and understanding are preferred — so, not to worry that your student with her good Spanish cannot present a direct translation.

What must be made clear is that the translations are those of the student; these are her understandings. Readers can make of that what they will — and if unsure, are presented with the original — they can seek another translation. A note in the acknowledgements and/or in the introduction to the effect that all translations are those of the writer is. essential.

In response to the question about the Bibliography/Works cited, my preference would be to list the source in its original Thai version, but perhaps with the English in brackets, to help the examiner.

Your bibliography will have the entries in Thai characters first in the document. Any in-text citation to Thai sources will be in (Thai characters [English translation]).

Ex:

Citation in Thai [English translation]

Format of the Extended Essay

The extended essay should be written in a clear, correct and formal academic style, appropriate to the subject from which the topic is drawn. Given that the extended essay is a formally written research paper, it should strive to maintain a professional, academic look.

To help achieve this, the following formatting is Required:

  • 12-point, readable font (Calibri or Times New Roman);
  • Double spacing throughout entire Essay;
  • Page numbering — top right corner;
  • No candidate or school name or supervisor name on the title page or page headers.

Submitting the extended essay in the required format will help set the tone of the essay and will aid readability for on-screen assessment by examiners.

Required S tructure

The structure of the essay is very important. It helps students to organize the argument, making the best use of the evidence collected.

There are six required elements of the final work to be submitted. More details about each element are given in the “Presentation” section. Please note that the order in which these elements are presented here is not necessarily the order in which they should be written.

Six required elements of the extended essay:

  1. Title page
  2. Contents page
  3. Introduction
  4. Body of the essay
  5. Conclusion
  6. References and bibliography — if MLA «Works Cited» if CSE «References»

The title page should include Only the following information:

  • The title of the essay
  • The research question
  • The subject the essay is registered in (if it is a language essay also state which category it falls into; if a world studies essay also state the theme and the two subjects utilized)
  • Word count

The upper limit is 4,000 words for all extended essays.

Please note: Examiners are instructed not to read or assess any material in excess of the word limit. This means that essays containing more than 4,000 words will be compromised across all assessment criteria. Given the holistic nature of the assessment criteria, students who write in excess of the word limit will self-penalize across all criteria.

2. Required Contents Page

A contents page must be provided at the beginning of the extended essay and all pages should be numbered. Please note that an index page is not required and if included will be treated as if it is not present.

3. Required Introduction

The introduction should tell the reader what to expect in the essay. The introduction should make clear to the reader the focus of the essay, the scope of the research, in particular an indication of the sources to be used, and an insight into the line of argument to be taken.

While students should have a sense of the direction and key focus of their essay, it is sometimes advisable to finalize the introduction once the body of the essay is complete.

4. Required Body of the Essay (research, analysis, discussion, and evaluation)

The main task is writing the body of the essay, which should be presented in the form of a reasoned argument. The form of this varies with the subject of the essay but as the argument develops it should be clear to the reader what relevant evidence has been discovered, where/how it has been discovered and how it supports the argument. In some subjects, for example, the sciences, sub-headings within the main body of the essay will help the reader to understand the argument (and will also help the student to keep on track). In structuring their extended essay, students must take into consideration the expected conventions of the subject in which their extended essay is registered.

Once the main body of the essay is complete, it is possible to finalize the introduction (which tells the reader what to expect) and the conclusion (which says what has been achieved, including notes of any limitations and any questions that have not been resolved).

Any information that is important to the argument Must not be included in appendices or footnotes/endnotes. The examiner Will not read notes or appendices, so an essay that is not complete in itself will be compromised across the assessment criteria.

5. Required Conclusion

The conclusion says what has been achieved, including notes of any limitations and any questions that have not been resolved. While students might draw conclusions throughout the essay based on their findings, it is important that there is a final, summative conclusion at the end. This conclusion(s) must relate to the research question posed.

6. Required References & Bibliography

Students should use their chosen style of academic referencing as soon as they start writing. That way they are less likely to forget to include a citation. It is also easier than trying to add references at a later stage. For more information on this, refer to the guidelines in the IB document Effective citing and referencing.

Writing the essay takes time but if students have used their Researcher’s reflection space and reflection sessions in a meaningful way they should be well prepared to develop their arguments.

Ib history extended essay mark scheme

Please fill in the following form to contact the author, Russel Tarr (@russeltarr)

New customer?

The Extended Essay is an individual project of 4000 words.

It is a chance to study a topic that interests you which is not covered by the syllabus.
It can cover any historical topic of your choice from outside the past 10 years.
It is supervised by your History teacher, but marked by the IB board.
It will involve an emphasis on personal research and the use of primary sources.

Click on the following headings to get guidance in choosing a question and writing your study.

After the first batch of studies are marked according to the new criteria in Summer 2018, I hope to upload some particularly good studies to this website to share with everyone.

It gives you a chance to study in real depth a topic that you have an interest in.
It can relate to any period and any topic within the last 10 years.
It gives you the chance to work closely with your History teacher to ‘fast-track’ your historical skills with one-to-one tutoring.
As such it is a great opportunity to produce a mature academic study on something that you might never again have the chance to research.

Similarities:
Both the IA and the EE in History award students who choose an interesting question which they research thoroughly and answer coherently through critical evaluation of evidence.

Differences:
The IA is only 1500 words long; the EE is 4,000 words.
The EE requires a much heavier emphasis on the use of primary source material than the IA.
The IA is structured into specific sections; the EE is structured more flexibly.
The IA markscheme grades each section separately; the EE markscheme grades each criteria across the essay as a whole.

You will select which of your IB subjects will form the basis of your EE in the Spring Term of the first year of IB. This will usually (although not always) be one of your Higher Level subjects. The supervisor will set a series of internal deadlines and meetings for each student to ensure the completion of the study in a timely fashion.

Start by considering if there is a period / place / person / issue in history that would like to investigate further. Maybe this is something you have read a little about, watched a film about or are interested in from your other studies / hobbies. The only strict rule is that anything that happened in the past 10 years is not allowed.

The three main focuses of study tend to be focused on

  • EITHER Causes of an event / situation;
  • OR Consequences of an event / situation
  • OR Relevance of particular evidence about an event / situation (e. g. a painting, novel, film, biography).

The following resources may help you in your quest for a topic:

Online archives:

Other resources:

  • History Department Magazine collection
  • History Department DVD collection

Once you have settled upon a topic, you have to then turn this into a question — a problem that your study will solve, in other words.

Submission deadline

The International Baccalaureate® (IB) sets a submission date for the extended essay, which is communicated with schools.

It is each school’s responsibility to ensure that all candidate work is received by the IB, with the required paperwork received by the submission date set.

Schools should set internal deadlines

Schools and supervisors are strongly recommended to set internal deadlines for the different stages of producing an extended essay, keeping in mind the IB’s submission date.

If you wish to find out more about the deadline for a particular school, please contact that school directly.

Further information on deadline setting

There is further information on the requirements for meeting external deadlines in the Handbook of Procedures for the Diploma Programme.

Educators in IB World Schools can access the relevant parts of the handbook in the IB’s Programme Resource Centre (PRC), using their existing log-in details.

[/H1toH2]