Palmyra tree essay

My Family History Essay

Get custom essay sample written according to your requirements

urgent 3h delivery guaranteed

Family history is very important to remember. By knowing where you come from, you can have a knowledge of your family. Interviewing our family members is the best way to have a clear understanding of our family background. It allows you to appreciate your family history. After you interview your family, what you learn may influence So our roots and origin is one of the most important things to explore. It can bring me closer to myself discovery. What I can discover about the roots of my family is not likely to make headlines, but may build a family tree that can be both interesting and surprising.

Trying find out about a family history is a good way to learn something and grow from it. Good or bad, one thing is sure: we cannot change the past. One famous writer said”In all of us there is a hunger, marrow deep, to know our heritage—to know who we are and where we came from. Without this enriching knowledge, there is a hollow yearning. No matter what our attainments in life, there is still a vacuum, an emptiness, and the most disquieting loneliness. ” — Alex Haley This quote shows that finding our family origins and family history are very important. Sometimes, our family history can influence us.

We will write a custom essay sample on My Family History specifically for you
for only $16.38 $13.9/page

We will write a custom essay sample on My Family History specifically for you
FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9 /page

We will write a custom essay sample on My Family History specifically for you
FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9 /page

So I interviewed my father and my sister. My father’s side of the family originally came from GUANG DONG China, in the south of China. There are 9 people they are my grand-parents;aunts;and my uncles. Although my father is from the south of China but his great-great-grandfather lived in the north of China . Because that time in China, there were too many wars, people had to leave their home to other safe provinces. Other way to say this is originally of my family lived in two or three Chinese provinces. My grand-parents were our country’s soldiers and my great-grand parents were the soldiers too.

They all struggled for freedom and democracy! My father said he was proud he come from a military family. My grand father he lived through world war two and the new china war. He always if gave him one more choice to join the army or live like the normal, he would choose the army, because he loved the army too much! From GUANGDONG my father moved to SHENZHEN. because in 1978 China had just opened some coastal zones. SHENZHEN was a new city and there were many opportunities for my father. Form that time my father was a business man. My mother’s side of the family is all from HAINAN province.

I only know about my mother’s side history is my grand-parents had seven daughters. My mother met my father while they were both on the way to SHENZHEN city. In 1986 they had their first daughter, my oldest sister. But that time they were not living together, my sister and my mom lived in my hometown, my father was in SHENZHEN. In 1990 my dad had his own company and at the same time my second sister was born. After that they moved to a new city and bought our first house in that new city. In 1995 is important to me because I was born that year. When I was born my family was very happy because my family only had one son.

We lived in ShenZhen for 16 years and we were very halcyon happy. In 2008 my father made a big decision to move to canada. The reason is my dad hoped his three children have a good future and could live in fair society country. 2012 we moved to canada and started a new life. I think moving to canada is a new literary piece in my family history. It will be magnificent! In conclusion, researching my family history I learned so many things . i have learned my family history is magnificent and impressive. I have to be hard-working and continue my magnificent family history in canada!

Q. What are the health benefits and nutrition facts of Palmyra (aka Nungu) Fruit?

What are the health benefits and nutrition facts of Palmyra fruit Nungu Fruit)?

Welcome to icliniq. com.

First of all I would like to thank you for asking such a good question.

  • The Asian Palmyra palm or Sugar palm tree is full of healthy stuff. The health benefits of the fruit areas follows.
  • It is a natural coolant for the body. It is known to contain Vitamins A, B-complex and C.
  • It is known to contain essential minerals like zinc, potassium, iron and calcium. Also known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties.
  • Has been used in the treatment of nausea and vomiting and also worm infestation.
  • Has also been used as an expectorant and as a laxative.
  • The sap is used as a tonic, laxative, for treating ulcers and liver problems.
  • The pulp of the fruit is known to cure a number of inflammatory conditions of the skin.

For further information consult a nutritionist online —> https://www. icliniq. com/ask-a-doctor-online/nutritionist

Thanks for your answer. Can you give a little more details about the toddy, a sugary sap, derived from the tree?

Welcome back to icliniq. com.

  • The sap is best when taken fresh. After sometime, it gets fermented and becomes a mild alcoholic beverage.
  • The health benefits of the sap are,
  1. It is a low-fat, highly nutritive food contains protein, carbohydrate, vitamins and minerals.
  2. It acts as a natural coolant and good appetizer.
  3. It helps improve digestion and cures digestive problems.
  4. It is known to improve anemia.

Site of Palmyra

Site of Palmyra

An oasis in the Syrian desert, north-east of Damascus, Palmyra contains the monumental ruins of a great city that was one of the most important cultural centres of the ancient world. From the 1st to the 2nd century, the art and architecture of Palmyra, standing at the crossroads of several civilizations, married Graeco-Roman techniques with local traditions and Persian influences.

Description is available under license CC-BY-SA IGO 3.0

Site de Palmyre

Oasis du désert de Syrie au nord-est de Damas, Palmyre abrite les ruines monumentales d’une grande ville qui fut l’un des plus importants foyers culturels du monde antique. Au carrefour de plusieurs civilisations, l’art et l’architecture de Palmyre unirent aux I e r et II e siècles les techniques gréco-romaines aux traditions locales et aux influences de la Perse.

Description is available under license CC-BY-SA IGO 3.0

تحتضن هذه الواحة الواقعة في الصحراء السورية شمال شرق دمشق آثاراً ضخمة لمدينة كبيرة شكلت أحد أهم المراكز الثقافية في العالم القديم. ونظراً لوقوعها عند ملتقى حضارات عدة، دمجت تدمر في فنها وهندستها طوال القرنين الاول والثاني بين التقنيات اليونانية الرومانية والتقاليد المحلية وتأثيرات بلاد فارس.

source: UNESCO/ERI
Description is available under license CC-BY-SA IGO 3.0

source: UNESCO/ERI
Description is available under license CC-BY-SA IGO 3.0

Археологические памятники Пальмиры

В этом оазисе, расположенном в Сирийской пустыне к северо-востоку от Дамаска, находятся монументальные руины большого города, который был одним из важнейших культурных центров древнего мира. В I-II вв. искусство и архитектура Пальмиры, находящейся в месте, где соприкасались несколько цивилизаций, сочетали в себе греко-римские приемы, местные традиции и персидские влияния.

source: UNESCO/ERI
Description is available under license CC-BY-SA IGO 3.0

Sitio de Palmira

Situado al nordeste de Damasco, en el desierto de Siria, el oasis de Palmira alberga las ruinas monumentales de una gran ciudad que fue uno de los centros culturales más importantes de la Antigüedad. Sometidas a la influencia de diversas civilizaciones, la arquitectura y las artes de Palmira fusionaron en los siglos I y II las técnicas grecorromanas con las tradiciones artísticas autóctonas y persas.

source: UNESCO/ERI
Description is available under license CC-BY-SA IGO 3.0

Gebied van Palmyra

Palmyra is een oase in de Syrische woestijn ten noordoosten van Damascus. Het bevat monumentale ruïnes van een grote stad die een van de meest belangrijke culturele centra van de oude wereld was. De stad bevond zich van de 1e tot de 2e eeuw op een kruispunt van verschillende beschavingen. In die tijd zorgden de kunst en architectuur van Palmyra ervoor dat Grieks-Romeinse technieken zich verenigden met lokale tradities en Perzische invloeden. De pracht van de ruïnes van Palmyra heeft in belangrijke mate bijgedragen aan de verdere opleving van de klassieke bouwstijlen en stedenbouw in het Westen.

  • English
  • French
  • Arabic
  • Chinese
  • Russian
  • Spanish
  • Japanese
  • Dutch
Outstanding Universal Value

An oasis in the Syrian desert, north-east of Damascus, Palmyra contains the monumental ruins of a great city that was one of the most important cultural centres of the ancient world. From the 1st to the 2nd century, the art and architecture of Palmyra, standing at the crossroads of several civilizations, married Graeco-Roman techniques with local traditions and Persian influences.

First mentioned in the archives of Mari in the 2nd millennium BC, Palmyra was an established caravan oasis when it came under Roman control in the mid-first century AD as part of the Roman province of Syria. It grew steadily in importance as a city on the trade route linking Persia, India and China with the Roman Empire, marking the crossroads of several civilisations in the ancient world. A grand, colonnaded street of 1100 metres’ length forms the monumental axis of the city, which together with secondary colonnaded cross streets links the major public monuments including the Temple of Ba’al, Diocletian’s Camp, the Agora, Theatre, other temples and urban quarters. Architectural ornament including unique examples of funerary sculpture unites the forms of Greco-roman art with indigenous elements and Persian influences in a strongly original style. Outside the city’s walls are remains of a Roman aqueduct and immense necropolises.

Discovery of the ruined city by travellers in the 17th and 18th centuries resulted in its subsequent influence on architectural styles.

Criterion (i): The splendour of the ruins of Palmyra, rising out of the Syrian desert north-east of Damascus is testament to the unique aesthetic achievement of a wealthy caravan oasis intermittently under the rule of Rome from the Ier to the 3rd century AD. The grand colonnade constitutes a characteristic example of a type of structure which represents a major artistic development.

Criterion (ii): Recognition of the splendour of the ruins of Palmyra by travellers in the 17th and 18th centuries contributed greatly to the subsequent revival of classical architectural styles and urban design in the West.

Criterion (iv): The grand monumental colonnaded street, open in the centre with covered side passages, and subsidiary cross streets of similar design together with the major public buildings, form an outstanding illustration of architecture and urban layout at the peak of Rome’s expansion in and engagement with the East. The great temple of Ba’al is considered one of the most important religious buildings of the 1st century AD in the East and of unique design. The carved sculptural treatment of the monumental archway through which the city is approached from the great temple is an outstanding example of Palmyrene art. The large scale funerary monuments outside the city walls in the area known as the Valley of the Tombs display distinctive decoration and construction methods.

All the key attributes, including the main colonnaded street, major public buildings and funerary monuments, lie within the boundary. The tower tombs and the citadel are vulnerable to minor earthquakes and lack of conservation. Since the time of inscription, the population of the adjacent town has increased and is encroaching on the archaeological zone. Although traffic has increased, the main road that passed through the site has been diverted. Increased tourism has brought pressure for facilities within the property.

The key attributes display well their grandeur and splendour. However the setting is vulnerable to the encroachment of the adjacent town that could impact adversely on the way the ruins are perceived as an oasis closely related to their desert surroundings.

Protection and management requirements (2009)

The site was designated a national monument and is now protected by the National Antiquities law 222 as amended in 1999. A buffer zone was established in 2007 but has not yet been submitted to the World Heritage Committee.

The regional strategic action plan currently under preparation is expected to provide guidelines to expand and redefine the site as a cultural landscape, with respect to the transitional zones around the archaeological site, the oasis and the city.

There is an on-going need for a conservation and restoration plan to be developed that addresses fully the complex issues associated with this extensive multiple site and will allow for coordinated management, clear priorities and a cultural tourism strategy and address the issues of expansion of the nearby town.